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William Taylor

Deputy Director, Second Amendment Litigation

William works to defend gun-safety laws against Second Amendment and other constitutional challenges.

As Deputy Director, Second Amendment Litigation at Everytown Law, William supports state attorneys general and city attorneys in Second Amendment cases, helps manage Everytown’s amicus practice, represents municipalities defending their gun laws in court, and speaks publicly at law schools and in other settings about the Second Amendment and the future of gun litigation. William works out of Everytown Law’s New York office. 

Before joining Everytown, William served, for more than five years, as an Assistant Attorney General in the Litigation Bureau at the New York Attorney General’s Office, where he represented the state and its agencies and officers in a wide variety of civil actions, with a particular focus on Second Amendment litigation. William was lead counsel for the State of New York in numerous Second Amendment and other gun cases, including New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Cuomo, in which the district court upheld New York’s restrictions on assault weapons and large-capacity magazines against a Second Amendment challenge, a decision later affirmed on appeal. In recognition of his work on gun litigation, William received the 2016 Louis J. Lefkowitz Memorial Award for outstanding performance as an Assistant Attorney General.

William previously worked for over a decade as a litigator at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP in New York City, where he had a broad general litigation practice, across a variety of civil matters, at both trial and appellate levels. He also served as a law clerk to Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. William received his undergraduate degree from Duke University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was Editor and Book Review Chair of the Harvard Law Review.

Speaking Engagements

March 6, 2020: William Taylor at The University of Chicago Law School Symposium on Gun Violence